Tag: Galaxies

The Serpens Constellation

The Serpens Constellation

Serpens is a constellation of the northern hemisphere. One of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century astronomer Ptolemy, it remains one of the 88 modern constellations defined by the International Astronomical Union. It is unique among the modern constellations in being split into two non-contiguous parts, Serpens Caput (Serpent Head) to the west and Serpens Cauda (Serpent Tail) to the

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The Sculptor Constellation

The Sculptor Constellation

Sculptor is a small and faint constellation in the southern sky. It represents a sculptor. It was introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille in the 18th century. He originally named it Apparatus Sculptoris (the sculptor’s studio), but the name was later shortened. Sculptor is bordered by Aquarius and Cetus to the north, Fornax to the east, Phoenix to the south, Grus to the southwest, and Piscis Austrinus to the

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The Sagittarius Constellation

The Sagittarius Constellation

Sagittarius is one of the constellations of the zodiac. It is one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century astronomer Ptolemy and remains one of the 88 modern constellations. Its name is Latin for the archer, and its symbol is a stylized arrow. Sagittarius is commonly represented as a centaur pulling back a bow. It lies between Scorpius and Ophiuchus to the west and Capricornus and Microscopium to the east.

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Sagitta Constellation

The Sagitta Constellation

Sagitta is a dim but distinctive constellation in the northern sky. Its name is Latin for “arrow,” and it should not be confused with the significantly larger constellation Sagittarius, the archer. Although Sagitta is an ancient constellation, it has no star brighter than 3rd magnitude and has the third-smallest area of all constellations (only Equuleus and Crux are smaller). It was

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Pyrix Constellation

The Pyxis Constellation

Pyxis is a small and faint constellation in the southern sky. Abbreviated from Pyxis Nautica, its name is Latin for a mariner’s compass (contrasting with Circinus, which represents a draftsman’s compasses). Pyxis was introduced by Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille in the 18th century, and it is located close to the stars that formed the old constellation Argo Navis, the ship of Jason and the Argonauts. Parts of

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The Piscis Austrinus Constellation

The Piscis Austrinus Constellation

Piscis Austrinus is a constellation in the southern celestial hemisphere. The name is Latin for “the southern fish,” in contrast with the larger constellation Pisces, which represents a pair of fishes. Prior to the 20th century, it was also known as Piscis Notius. Piscis Austrinus was one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century astronomer Ptolemy, and it

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The Pictor Constellation

The Pictor Constellation

Pictor is a constellation in the Southern Celestial Hemisphere, located between the star Canopus and the Large Magellanic Cloud. Its name is Latin for a painter and is an abbreviation of the older name Equuleus Pictoris (the “painter’s easel”). Normally represented as an easel, Pictor was named by Abbé Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille in the 18th century. Pictor is a small constellation bordered by Columba to the north, Puppis and Carina to

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The Phoenix Constellation

The Phoenix Constellation

Phoenix is a minor constellation in the southern sky. Named after the mythical phoenix, it was first depicted on a celestial atlas by Johann Bayer in his 1603 Uranometria. The French explorer and astronomer Nicolas Louis de Lacaille charted the brighter stars and gave their Bayer designations in 1756. The constellation stretches from roughly −39° to −57° declination, and from 23.5h to

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The Perseus Constellation

The Perseus Constellation

Perseus is a constellation in the northern sky, being named after the Greek mythological hero Perseus. It is one of the 48 listed by the 2nd-century astronomer Ptolemy, and among the 88 modern constellations defined by the International Astronomical Union. It is located near several other constellations named after ancient Greek legends surrounding Perseus, including Andromeda to the west and Cassiopeia to the north. Perseus

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The Pegasus Constellation

The Pegasus Constellation

Pegasus is a constellation in the northern sky, named after the winged horse Pegasus in Greek mythology. It was one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century astronomer Ptolemy and is one of the 88 constellations recognised today. Covering 1121 square degrees, Pegasus is the seventh-largest of the 88 constellations. Pegasus is bordered by Andromeda

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The Pavo Constellation

The Pavo Constellation

Pavo is a constellation in the southern sky whose name is Latin for “peacock.” Pavo first appeared on a 35-cm (14 in) diameter celestial globe published in 1598 in Amsterdam by Plancius and Jodocus Hondius and was depicted in Johann Bayer’s star atlas Uranometria of 1603 and was likely conceived by Petrus Plancius from the observations of Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser and Frederick de Houtman. French explorer and astronomer Nicolas-Louis

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The Orion Constellation

The Orion Constellation

Orion is a prominent constellation located on the celestial equator and visible throughout the world. It is one of the most conspicuous and recognizable constellations in the night sky. It was named after Orion, a hunter in Greek mythology. Orion is bordered by Taurus to the northwest, Eridanus to the southwest, Lepus to the south, Monoceros to the east, and Gemini

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The Ophiuchus Constellation

The Ophiuchus Constellation

Ophiuchus is a large constellation straddling the celestial equator. Its name is from the Greek Ὀφιοῦχος Ophioukhos; “serpent-bearer,” and it is commonly represented as a man grasping the snake that is represented by the constellation Serpens; the interposition of his body divides the snake constellation Serpens into two parts, Serpens Caput and Serpens Cauda, which are in modern times taken with

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The Octans Constellation

The Octans Constellation

Octans is a faint constellation located in the deep southern sky. Its name is Latin for the eighth part of a circle, but it is named after the octant, a navigational instrument. The constellation was devised by French astronomer Nicolas Louis de Lacaille in 1752, and it remains one of the 88 modern constellations. Octans is the 50th constellation in

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The Norma Constellation

The Norma Constellation

Norma is a small constellation in the Southern Celestial Hemisphere between Ara and Lupus, one of twelve drawn up in the 18th century by French astronomer Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille. Its name is Latin for normal, referring to a right angle, and is variously considered to represent a rule, a carpenter’s square, a set square or a level. It remains one of the 88 modern constellations.

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The Musca Constellation

The Musca Constellation

  Musca (Latin for “the fly”) is a small constellation in the deep southern sky. It was one of 12 constellations created by Petrus Plancius from the observations of Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser and Frederick de Houtman. The first depiction of this constellation in a celestial atlas was in Johann Bayer’s Uranometria of 1603. It was also known as Apis (Latin for “the bee”) for 200 years. Musca remains below

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The Monoceros Constellation

The Monoceros Constellation

Monoceros is a faint constellation on the celestial equator. Its name is Greek for a unicorn. Its definition is attributed to the 17th-century Dutch cartographer Petrus Plancius. Monoceros is the 35th constellation in size, occupying an area of 482 square degrees. It is located in the second quadrant of the northern hemisphere and can be seen

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