Category: Horticultural Wonders

Cattleya

Cattleya, The Queen Of Orchids

Cattleya, The Queen Of Orchids. Cattleya, often called the Queen of Orchids, is a genus of orchids from Costa Rica south to Argentina. The genus was named in 1824 by John Lindley after horticulturalist William Cattley. Cattley obtained a specimen of then unnamed Cattleya labiata from William Swainson who had discovered the new plant in Pernambuco, Brazil, in

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Lily of the Valley

Lily Of The Valley

Lily Of The Valley. Lily of the valley, scientific name Convallaria majalis, is a sweet scented, highly poisonous woodland flowering plant that is native throughout the cool temperate Northern Hemisphere in Asia and Europe. In the APG III system, the genus is placed in the famil y Asparagaceae, subfamily Nolinoidaea (formerly the family Ruscaceae). Convallaria majalis is a herbaceous perennial

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Protea

Protea

Protea. Protea is both the botanical name and the English common name of a genus of South African flowering plants, sometimes also called sugarbushes. In local tradition, the flower represents change and hope. The Proteaceae family to which proteas belong is an ancient one among angiosperms. Evidence from pollen fossils suggest Proteaceae ancestors grew in Gondwana, in the Upper

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Cyclamen

Cyclamen

Cyclamen. Cyclamen is a genus of 23 species of perennial flowering plants in the family Primulaceae. They are native to Europe and the Mediterranean Basin east to Iran, with one specie in Somalia. They grow from tubers and are valued for their flowers with upswept petals and variably patterned leaves. In most species, leaves come up in autumn, grow through the winter, and then die in spring, then the plant goes dormant through the dry Mediterranean summer. Petal colour may be

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Crocus

Crocus. Crocus is a genus of flowering plants in the iris family comprising 90 species of perennials growing from bulbo-tubers. Many are cultivated for their flowers appearing in autumn, winter, or spring. Crocuses are native to woodland, scrub, and meadows from sea level to alpine tundra in central and southern Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, on the islands of the Aegean, and across Central Asia to Xinjiang Province in western China.

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As Demand for Ginseng Soars, Poachers Threaten Its Survival.

As Demand for Ginseng Soars, Poachers Threaten Its Survival

As Demand for Ginseng Soars, Poachers Threaten Its Survival. Ginseng is any one of the 11 species of slow-growing perennial plants with fleshy roots, belonging to the genus Panax of the family Araliaceae. It is found in North America and in eastern Asia (mostly northeast China, Korea, Bhutan, eastern Siberia), typically in cooler climates. Over centuries, ginseng has been

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Gordonia

Gordonia. Gordonia is a genus of flowering plants in the family Theaceae, related to Franklinia, Camellia, and Stewartia. Of the roughly 40 species, all but two are native to southeast Asia, southern China, Taiwan and Indochina. The remaining species, G. lasianthus, is native to southeast North America, from Virginia south to Florida and west to Louisiana; G. fruticosa is native to the tropical rainforests of Central and South America,

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Monarda

Monarda

Monarda. Monarda is a genus of annual and perennial herbaceous flowering plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae. The genus is native to North America. Common names include bee balm, horsemint, oswego tea, and bergamot. The genus was named after the Spanish botanist Nicolás Monardes, who wrote a book in 1574 describing plants of the New World. They grow erect to heights of 20–90 cm (8–35 in).

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Sequoias, the Ancient Giants.

Sequoias, the Ancient Giants

Sequoias, the Ancient Giants. Sequoiadendron giganteum or the giant redwood is the sole living species in the genus Sequoiadendron, and one of three species of coniferous trees classified in the family Cupressaceae in the subfamily Sequoioideae; the Sequoia sempervirens and Sequoiadendron of California and Oregon (United States) and Metasequoia glyptostroboides (China). The redwood species contains the largest and tallest

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