Corpse Flower

Amorphophallus TitanumCorpse Flower

Amorphophallus titanum, also known as the titan arum, is a flowering plant with the largest unbranched inflorescence in the world, reaching over 3 metres (10 ft) in height. In cultivation, it generally requires 7–10 years of vegetative growth before blooming for the first time. After its initial blooming, there can be considerable variation in blooming frequency. Some plants may not bloom again for another 7–10 years while others may bloom every two to three years. Due to its odor, which is like the smell of a rotting animal, the titan arum is characterized as a carrion flower, and is also known as the corpse flower, or corpse plant (Indonesian: bunga bangkai – bunga means flower, while bangkai can be translated as corpse). It is native solely to the rain forests of western Sumatra’s limestone hills.

Amorphophallus CormThe corm is the largest known, typically weighing around 50 kilograms (110 lb). When a specimen at the Princess of Wales Conservatory, Kew Gardens, was repotted after its dormant period, the weight was recorded as 91 kilograms (201 lb). In 2006, a corm in the Botanical Garden of Bonn, Germany was recorded at 117 kilograms (258 lb).

At Kew Gardens London

Amorphophallus Titanum Pollen Area
Amorphophallus Titanum Pollen Area

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Article Here:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/09/150930-stinky-corpse-flower-chicago-botanic-garden-blooms/