Sunday, 22 April, 2018

Tag: Galaxies

The Crux Constellation

The Crux Constellation

The Crux is a constellation located in the southern sky in a bright portion of the Milky Way. It is among the most easily distinguished constellations, as all of its four main stars have an apparent visual magnitude above +2.8, even though it is the smallest of all 88 modern constellations. Its name is Latin for cross, and it is dominated by a cross-shaped

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The Corvus Constellation

The Corvus Constellation

Corvus is a small constellation in the Southern Celestial Hemisphere. Its name means “raven” in Latin. One of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century astronomer Ptolemy, it depicts a raven, a bird associated with stories about the god Apollo, perched on the back of Hydra, the water snake. Covering 184 square degrees and hence 0.446% of the sky, Corvus

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Corona Borealis Constellation

The Corona Borealis Constellation

Corona Borealis is a small constellation in the Northern Celestial Hemisphere. It is one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century astronomer Ptolemy and remains one of the 88 modern constellations. Its brightest stars form a semicircular arc. Its Latin name, inspired by its shape, means “northern crown.” In classical mythology, Corona Borealis generally represented the crown given by the god Dionysus to

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The Corona Australis Constellation

Corona Australis is a constellation in the Southern Celestial Hemisphere. Its Latin name means “southern crown,” and it is the southern counterpart of Corona Borealis, the northern crown. It is one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century astronomer Ptolemy, and it remains one of the 88 modern constellations. The Ancient Greeks saw Corona Australis

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Columba Constellation

The Columba Constellation

Columba is a small, faint constellation created in the late sixteenth century. Its name is Latin for dove. Columba is the 54th constellation in size, occupying an area of 270 square degrees. It lies in the first quadrant of the southern hemisphere (SQ1) and can be seen at latitudes between +45° and -90°. The neighbouring constellations

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The Circinus Constellation

The Circinus Constellation

Circinus is a small, faint constellation in the southern sky, first defined in 1756 by the French astronomer Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille. Its name is Latin for compass, referring to the drafting tool used for drawing circles (it should not be confused with Pyxis, a constellation that represents a mariner’s compass which points north). Bordered by Centaurus (Circinus is located at the bottom of Centaurus’ left

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Cetus Constellation

The Cetus Constellation

The Cetus Constellation. Cetus, its name refers to a sea monster in Greek mythology, although it is often called ‘the whale’ today. Cetus is located in the region of the sky that contains other water-related constellations such as Aquarius, Pisces, and Eridanus. Although Cetus is not considered part of the zodiac, the ecliptic passes less than a quarter of a degree

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The Cepheus Constellation

The Cepheus Constellation

The Cepheus Constellation. Cepheus is a constellation in the northern sky, which is named after Cepheus, a King in the Greek mythology. Cepheus was the King of Ethiopia, married to Cassiopeia and was the father of Andromeda, both of whom are immortalised as modern day constellations. It is one of the 48 constellations listed by the second-century astronomer Ptolemy, and it remains

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The Centaurus Constellation

The Centaurus Constellation. Centaurus is a bright constellation in the northern sky. One of the largest constellations, Centaurus was included among the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century astronomer Ptolemy, and it remains one of the 88 modern constellations. In Greek mythology, Centaurus represents a centaur; a creature that is half human, half horse. It is best seen

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Cassiopeia Constellation

The Cassiopeia Constellation

The Cassiopeia Constellation. Cassiopeia is a constellation in the northern sky, named after the vain queen Cassiopeia in Greek mythology, who boasted about her unrivalled beauty. Cassiopeia was one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century Greek astronomer Ptolemy, and it remains one of the 88 modern constellations today. It is easily recognizable due to its

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The Carina Constellation

The Carina Constellation

The Carina Constellation. Carina is a constellation in the southern sky. Its name is Latin for the keel of a ship, and it was formerly part of the larger constellation of Argo Navis, the great ship of Jason and the Argonauts who searched for the Golden Fleece, until Nicolas Louis de Lacaille divided Argo into three sections in 1763, the other two being Puppis (the poop deck),

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The Nature of Space and Time

The Nature of Space and Time

The Nature of Space and Time. A pair of researchers have uncovered a potential bridge between general relativity and quantum mechanics — the two preeminent physics theories — and it could force physicists to rethink the very nature of space and time. Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity describes gravity as a geometric property

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The Capricornus Constellation

The Capricornus Constellation

The Capricornus Constellation. Capricornus, as its name implies is Latin for “horned goat” or “goat horn”, and it is commonly represented in the form of a sea-goat: a mythical creature that is half goat, half fish. Capricornus is one of the 88 modern constellations and was also one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century

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Canis Minor Constellation

Canis Minor Constellation

Canis Minor Constellation. Canis Minor is a small constellation in the northern celestial hemisphere. In the second century, it was included as an asterism, or pattern, of two stars in Ptolemy’s 48 constellations, and it is counted among the 88 modern constellations. Its name is Latin for “lesser dog,” in contrast to Canis Major, the “greater dog;” both figures

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