LIVING CORAM DEO
Wednesday, 18 October, 2017
Porcupine

Porcupine

Porcupine. Porcupines are rodentian mammals with a coat of sharp spines, or quills, that protect against predators. The term covers two families of animals, the Old World porcupines of family Hystricidae, and the New World porcupines of family Erethizontidae. Both families belong to the infraorder Hystriccognathi within the profoundly diverse order Rodentia and display superficially similar coats of

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Potentilla

Potentilla

Potentilla. Potentilla is a genus containing over 300 species of annual, biennial and perennial herbaceous flowering plants in the rose family, Rosaceae. They are usually called cinquefoils in English. Potentilla are generally only found throughout the northern continents of the world, though some may even be found in montane biomes of the New Guinea Highlands. Typical cinquefoils look most similar

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Autumn Harvest At Gardens By The Bay (Part 2)

Autumn Harvest At Gardens By The Bay (Part 2)

Autumn Harvest At Gardens By The Bay (Part 2). Cucurbita (Latin for gourd) is a genus of herbaceous vines in the gourd family, Cucurbitaceae, native to the Andes and Mesoamerica. Five species are grown worldwide for their edible fruit, variously known as squash, pumpkin, or gourd depending on species and variety, and for their seeds. First cultivated in the Americas

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Stick Insect

Stick Insect

Stick Insect. The Phasmatodea are an order of insects, whose members are variously known as stick insects in Europe and Australasia; stick-bugs, walking sticks or bug sticks in the United States and Canada; or as phasmids, ghost insects or leaf insects (generally the family Phylliidae). The group’s name is derived from the Ancient Greek phasma, meaning an apparition or phantom, referring to the resemblance of many species to sticks or leaves. Their natural camouflage makes

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Rudbeckia

Rudbeckia

Rudbeckia. Rudbeckia is a plant genus in the sunflower family, commonly called coneflowers and black-eyed-susans; all are native to North America and many species are cultivated in gardens for their showy yellow or gold flower heads. The name was given by Carolus Linnaeus in honour of his teacher at Uppsala University, Professor Olof Rudbeck

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Ladybird

Ladybird

Ladybird. Coccinellidae is a widespread family of small beetles ranging from 0.8 to 18 mm (0.03 to 0.71 inches). They are found worldwide, with over 6,000 species described. Coccinellids are known as ladybugs in North America, and ladybirds in Britain and other parts of the English-speaking world. Entomologists widely prefer the names ladybird beetles or lady beetles as these insects are not classified as true

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The Frozen Ark Project

The Frozen Ark Project

The Frozen Ark Project. The Frozen Ark is a charitable frozen zoo project created jointly by the Zoological Society of London, the Natural History Museum and University of Nottingham. The project aims to preserve the DNA and living cells of endangered species to retain the genetic knowledge for the future. The Frozen Ark collects and stores

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Neonicotinoid Pesticides Harm Bees

Neonicotinoid Pesticides Harm Bees

Neonicotinoid Pesticides Harm Bees. Neonicotinoids are a class of neuro-active insecticides chemically similar to nicotine. In the 1980s Shell and in the 1990s Bayer started work on their development. The neonicotinoid family includes acetamiprid, clothianidin, imidacloprid, nitenpyram, nithiazine, thiacloprid and thiamethoxam. Imidacloprid is the most widely used insecticide in the world. Compared to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, neonicotinoids cause less toxicity in birds and

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Sloth

Sloth

Sloth. Sloths are mammals classified in the families Megalonychidae (two-toed sloths) and Bradypodidae (three-toed sloths). There are six extant species of sloths. They are named after the capital sin of sloth because they seem slow and lazy at first glance; however, their usual idleness is due to metabolic adaptations for conserving energy. Aside from their surprising bursts of speed

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